There wasn’t much to dish on season two of Showtime drama Masters of Sex, considering production began just a week ago. But the cast and executive producers at the PaleyFest panel Monday night had plenty to say about last season, including why staying true to a period piece means wearing the proper undergarment, even for a non-sex scene.

Lizzy Caplan mentioned that on set Breaking Bad’s Betsy Brandt, newly added for season two, asked her how the women handle going to the bathroom wearing such undergarments: “A couple days ago, she said, ‘How do you do this?!’ ”

Michael Sheen joined Caplan on the panel, along with co-stars Caitlin Fitzgerald, Teddy Sears, and Annaleigh Ashford and EPs Michelle Ashford and Sarah Timberman, who said they came directly to the Dolby Theater from shooting a season two scene. They were watching a scene between Beau Bridges and Allison Janney; Timberman said, “We were both weeping and weeping,” giving a nod to the actors’ well-received scenes in the first season.

Below are some of the other highlights from the panel, as the cast recalled their favorite moments, auditions and all those sex scenes:

1. Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan disagree on audiences’ smarts

When Caplan was cast for the part of Virginia Johnson, she was filming the comedy Hot Tub Time Machine and mentioned it was one of the many reasons she took the role — “proving to myself I could do more than one thing,” she said. Upon the wild applause the comedy received from the audience, Sheen jokingly condemned the theater. Caplan later praised the show’s feminist story, adding, “It’s so refreshing and proves how smart audiences are to demand more. Hear that, Michael?”

2. Annaleigh Ashford auditioned as a buttoned-up secretary and came out a hooker

The actress talked about how she wore a pink button-up shirt and read for the part of Jane (played by Helene York) but was called back to read the part of the rambunctious brothel worker Betty, as she unbuttoned her shirt as far as she could and put on her now signature accent. The EPs agreed it suited her better. “It was all wrong. But she makes such a good hooker,” Michelle Ashford said, to laughter.

3. Showtime gave one sex note

Timberman mentioned how “completely in-step” Showtime and Sony have been for them, but that they did receive one note: “There’s too much sex in this episode.”

4. Location, location, location

The Sony studio parking lot and an entrance to one building are used as the hospital entrance and parking lot in the show. Many of the interior hospital scenes were shot in an abandoned tuberculosis hospital from the ’30s. “It looked like a Stephen King nightmare,” Michelle Ashford said. “It was sexy!” Annaleigh Ashford joked.

5. Teddy Sears’ sex audition tape

As the actor talked about how it was performing his audition for the show, in which he had to read a sex scene, Sheen jokingly added that they had the tape to show everyone at the theater.

6. There’s an emphasis on “the more complicated choice”

Sheen brought up the idea of how the show always goes for the more complicated choice, and that theme of discussion ran through the evening. Caplan mentioned how, even amid a love triangle, neither woman played by Caplan and Fitzgerald is portrayed as a “villain” or as the “doormat.” This three-way relationship, Michelle Ashford added, lasted an entire 10 years in the real-life story of Bill Masters and Virginia Johnson.

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Keke Palmer, Betsy Brandt & Danny Huston are the latest to recur in Masters Of Sex Season 2. More details below:

Showtime’s Masters of Sex is adding another player.

Keke Palmer has joined in a recurring capacity on the second season, the pay cabler announced Wednesday. She will play Coral, a nanny hired by the Masters to care for their new baby.

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Showtime’s Masters of Sex has enlisted a Breaking Bad favorite.

Betsy Brandt has boarded the second season of the Showtime drama, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

PHOTOS: THR’s Cover Shoot With the Stars of Showtime

Brandt will recur and play Barbara, new secretary to Dr. William Masters (Michael Sheen). She fills the role previously held by Margo Martindale’s Miss Horchow, who guest-starred in the series premiere, and Caitlin Fitzgerald’s Libby, who temporarily filled in as his secretary in season one.

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Showtime’s “Masters of Sex” has cast “American Horror Story” star Danny Huston for Season 2 as Dr. Douglas Greathouse, the privileged head of a hospital’s Obstetrics Department.

It will be a recurring role for Huston, who also appeared in “X-Men Origins: Wolverine.” He was nominated for a Golden Globe in 2013 for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television for his role in “Magic City.”

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Saturday night brought some big names to Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City to celebrate the Library Foundation of Los Angeles’ Sixth Annual Toast in support of the Los Angeles public library system.

Famed artist Shepard Fairey played DJ while stars like Lizzy Caplan, Nick Kroll, Amanda Peet, Jason Reitman, Topher Grace, Colin Hanks, Mark Duplass and Katie Aselton-Duplass mingled under twinkling lights before the night’s program began.

Moby kicked things off with a crowd sing-along, warning those not joining in that “not singing along results in impotence and sterility.” Cougar Town’s Busy Philipps played host of the evening as several of the celebrities in attendance were invited onstage to read from their favorite LA-themed works of literature.

Kroll read deadpan from Joe Loya’s The Man Who Outgrew His Prison Cell, joking that he had only just learned to read for this night. Next Aaron D. Spears of Being Mary Jane bellowed out an essay by Wanda Coleman that had the crowd cheering before he even finished. Caplan took the stage with a copy of John Fante’s Ask the Dust, admitting, “I used to carry this book around in high school because I thought it made me seem cool and interesting and slightly dark. Based on my walk up here from my chair I think it still works.”

Reitman followed her with a reading from Raymond Chandler’s Red Wind, noting the irony of “a kid from Beverly Hills” reading the blue-collar detective story. Finally comedian Tig Notaro went onstage to deliver off-the-wall critiques of everyone’s reading choices from the website Goodreads.

“My only memory of libraries was hanging out in there to try to skip school,” she prefaced. “I’ve read one book: Ribsy by Beverly Cleary. I did a book report on it every year.”

A closing musical performance by Jenny Lewis’ band Jenny and Johnny capped off the night, which Fairey summed up in his champagne toast like this: “Here’s to the libraries of Los Angeles and to doing good things for the people.”

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Today in awesome things that you missed and are now gone forever: In 2011, director Jason Reitman started a live read series at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), in which well-known actors do a table reading of a beloved film for a live audience. Past entries have included classics like The Apartment, The Breakfast Club, The Princess Bride, Ghostbusters, and The Big Lebowski. The films are not known in advance to the audience, so 600 lucky ticket holders got a pleasant surprise this past Thursday when a star-studded cast was on hand to read Pulp Fiction.

Jordan Peele and Joseph Gordon-Levitt played hit men Jules and Vincent, respectively, and they came dressed for the part. Lizzy Caplan read for Mia Wallace (and got up to dance with Gordon-Levitt for the twist contest scene). Wendell Pierce played gangster Marcellus Wallace. And, in the unlikeliest pairing, Jonah Hill filled Bruce Willis’ shoes as prizefighter Butch.

The rest of the cast played multiple smaller roles, with Seth Rogen playing drug dealer Lance, redneck shopkeeper Maynard, and over-caffeinated homeowner Jimmy. Michael Chiklis got to show off the most range, playing the timid, big-brained Brett and cool customer The Wolf, and he also got to deliver the “gold watch” monologue made famous by Christopher Walken. Rebecca Romijn showed off two different accents as cabbie Esmerelda and Butch’s French girlfriend Fabienne. And Nick Kroll played more or less the rest of the minor characters, including Marvin, Zed, Jackrabbit Slim’s Ed Sullivan-impersonating host, and even the Gimp.

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The full PaleyFest line up schedule has been revealed. Masters Of Sex is scheduled for March 24. Check out the rest of the lineup and for more information here.

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Check out this video of Lizzy mimic internet memes of rage faces.

Lizzy’s full interview is below:

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Loving Lizzy

Viewers tuning in to Showtime’s new series Masters of Sex (Sundays at 10 p.m. ET/PT, The Movie Network; 10 p.m. ET/9 p.m. PT, Movie Central) might find themselves doing a high school reunion–like double-take: “Is that babe in the pencil skirt Janis Ian?” Yes, Lizzy Caplan, who stars with Michael Sheen in the period drama about pioneering sexologists, is the same talented comedian who played the caustic goth in 2004’s hit film Mean Girls.

Unlike certain actresses, Caplan didn’t peak in North Shore High School. Her clever, quirky appeal has won her several acclaimed, if under-the-radar, roles: irreverent Casey on the late, great series Party Down; cynical cokehead Gena in the ensemble comedy Bachelorette; stylish marriage-phobe Sarah in the indie rom-com Save the Date. Next year, she’ll play a CIA agent in The Interview, an assassination caper directed by Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg. “I’ve always been picky with the parts I play,” says Caplan, “sometimes too picky—like, before I should have been able to be.” Being spoiled with roles she can “sink her teeth into,” she says, has been a blessing and a curse. It’s harder for her now to accept “the half-cooked role”—“the placeholder girls, instead of the fleshed-out three-dimensional characters.”

Caplan’s part in Masters is, happily, more well-done: She plays Virginia Johnson, the real-life down-on-her-luck secretary who teamed up with gynecologist Bill Masters on the controversial research that paved the way for the sexual revolution of the 1960s (she died this past July). A triple-divorcée who, says Caplan, “really prided herself on being able to separate the emotional from the sexual,” Johnson was a woman not of her time.

Convinced casting directors saw her only as a comedic actress, Caplan thought there was “no way in hell” she would land Johnson, and Masters of Sex creator Michelle Ashford admits that she “couldn’t envision Lizzy playing period.” But when Caplan auditioned, Ashford knew she’d met Virginia. “She was in ’50s clothing and had her hair done—she looked fantastic—but more than that, Lizzy just embodied this woman,” says Ashford. “The fact that she has this contemporary quality that runs underneath made her a perfect fit.”

Not content to wait for more scripts like Masters to arrive in her mailbox, Caplan is now thinking of writing her own role, ideally in a “really smart romantic comedy.” What would she play? “A sarcastic girl who can’t commit in relationships,” she deadpans. “Because I don’t think people have seen enough of that from me.”

See the full editorial on Flare Magazine

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FOR THE PAST 10 YEARS OR SO, Lizzy Caplan has been Hollywood’s version of an indie band: beloved but often little-seen – as a snarky, vengeful goth in Mean Girls, a snarky, pink-bow-tied caterer in the short-lived Starz series Party Down, and a snarky, coke-huffing,- leg-spreading bridesmaid in Bachelorette. With Showtime’s new series Masters of Sex, the Caplan cult is growing. The 31-year-old actress – who is no longer in a long-term relationship with Friends star Matthew Perry – is as comfortable talking about anatomy as Virginia Johnson, the curious, determined sex researcher she plays on Masters.

How has your life changed since Masters of Sex debuted?

My day-to-day life hasn’t changed. I’m extremely stressed out from flying back and forth to Canada to shoot a movie while I’m trying to move into a house I bought, which is my first house. I’ve been too anxiety–ridden to pay attention to the show premiering. Which sucks, because I’m finally on a show people give a shit about. But I will say I’ve felt a shift in how people perceive me as an actress. They now see I’m capable of playing somebody other than the sarcastic girl in a comedy.

Do you get recognized in public now?

Not really. I think I give off a don’t-come-chat-with-me vibe. And it’s on cable. The number of viewers we get pales in comparison to a network show. It’s not like I’m one of the kids from Glee.

The show takes place in 1956. Were you surprised by the differences between sexuality then and now?

Yes. It’s strange to realize how much of my modern outlook on female sexuality was informed by a woman and a team of scientists I had not heard of. The world saw female sexuality as problematic and nowhere near as important as male sexuality. It’s funny to think about [William] Masters [played by Michael Sheen] as a feminist icon, but he sort of is. It’s certainly not what he set out to do, but the science, the truth, set a lot of women free.

Then again, a lot of the public reaction to your show has amounted to “OMG, boobies!” Maybe we aren’t as sophisticated today as we think.

Big-time. It’s glaringly obvious to me. Just the word “sex” makes people uncomfortable in America. I thought we might go through a period of people saying, “Oh, my god, this is exploiting women, look at all these breasts! It’s just smut and porn.” But people quickly figured out that it really is a feminist show and not just an excuse to show a bunch of titties.

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Check out Lizzy’s recent interview on Chelsea Lately.

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